Whiting: 'Lauda knows nothing about safety'


Niki Lauda ( Daimler)
9 July 2014 by TF1T Staff | M
          

Niki Lauda's comments over the decision to red flag the British Grand Prix to replace a damaged safety barrier were "ridiculous" and "unhelpful" according to the FIA's Charlie Whiting.

The Austrian champion, who himself knows the dangers of F1, said the decision to replace the Armco hit by Kimi Raikkonen goes to show how "over-regulated" the sport has become.

He added: "They are never going to hit [that barrier] again. They take care of every little detail and a lot of people will switch the television off."

Whiting completely disagrees with Lauda's view and stressed the need to ensure safety comes before anything.

"Absolutely not," he said when asked if he thought Lauda had a valid point. "Niki's comment was not very helpful, because he has shown that he knows nothing about safety.

"It is ridiculous to say that an accident at the same spot will not occur," he told Auto Motor und Sport "If we had said after Felipe Massa’s accident in 2009 that a spring will never again hit a driver’s head, then there would not have been the campaign for stronger visors.

"It should also be mentioned that Kimi emerged basically unhurt from this massive accident, which is proof of how much has been done for the safety of the cars in recent years."

Whiting didn't completely disagree with Lauda's comments however, as he too agreed that Raikkonen shouldn't have kept his foot on the power as he rejoined.

"It would have been better, if Kimi was a little more cautious in cutting back onto the track.

"The drivers should be advised that, in future, they should return to the track at a reasonable speed,"

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